Iñupiatun 

Inupiaq language

​Iḷisimałiq Uqapiałiġmik
Knowledge of Language - Northwest Iñupiaq Value
About Iñupiatun

 

Iñupiaq is spoken by the Iñupiat on the Seward Peninsula, the Northwest Arctic and the North Slope of Alaska. It is closely related to other Inuit languages across the Arctic in Canada and Greenland. It is divided into two main dialects: Seward Peninsula and Northern Alaskan. About 2,144 speak the language, most of them elderly. Iñupiatun means literally "like an Iñupiaq (person)."

 

Like Yup’ik, Iñupiaq has three grammatical numbers: singular, dual and plural. For instance, the word for polar bear is nanuq, nannuk or nannut, depending on whether you are talking about one, two, or three or more polar bear(s).

Phrases

 

Qanuġitpiñ? 

Nakuuruŋa.

Quyanaq.

Paġlagivsi.

Uvlaalluataq.

Uvlulluataq.

Uvlaakulu.

Niġiñaqsiruq.

Ii.

Naumi.

How are you?

I'm good.

Thank you.

I welcome/greet you. (3 or more people)

Good morning.

Good day.

See you tomorrow.

It's time to eat.

Yes.

No.

Resources

Updated May 2019. 

All images and maps are courtesy of the Alaska Native Language Archive and the Alaska Native Language Center

Original funding for this site provided by Alaska Humanities Forum with in-kind support from the Alaska Native Language Preservation & Advisory Council.

This website acknowledges the traditional territories of the many Indigenous Alaskan Nations that have lived in and taken care of the lands of Alaska since time immemorial. 

  • Facebook - Black Circle
  • YouTube - Black Circle
  • Twitter - Black Circle

Have Questions? Connect with someone here.