Sugcestun

Sugpiaq/Alutiiq language

"Sugt'stun niuwacipet"
- "Our ways of speaking like a Sugpiaq"
- Kodiak Alutiiq value
Intro

 

Sugpiaq or Alutiiq (Sugcestun in the Sugpiaq language) is the language of the Sugpiaq people of Southcentral Alaska and Kodiak Island. Their language is closely related to Yup’ik, although speakers of the two languages would have difficulty understanding one another. About 200 Sugpiat speak the language today. The Sugpiaq language is divided into two main dialects: Koniag and Chugach. Koniag is spoken on Kodiak Island and on the Alaska Peninsula, while Chugach is spoken on the Kenai Peninsula and in Prince William Sound.

 

Sugpiaq is closely related to Central Yup’ik and the two languages share many vocabulary items, such as the word cama’i, meaning 'hello' or 'welcome.' The Sugpiaq language has seen a moderate comeback in recent years, especially on Kodiak Island, where several second-language speakers have been identified.

Phrases

 

Cama'i

Quyanaa

Aa'a

Qang'a

Tang'rciqamken

Qunukamken

Linganaa

Silugtua

Imasuugtua

Hello, Welcome

Thank you

Yes

No

I will see you

I love you

Sorry

I'm happy.

I'm sad.

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Updated January 2020. 

All images and maps are courtesy of the Alaska Native Language Archive and the Alaska Native Language Center

Original funding for this site provided by Alaska Humanities Forum with in-kind support from the Alaska Native Language Preservation & Advisory Council. Quyana to the volunteers who assist in keeping this website running. 

This website acknowledges the traditional territories of the many Indigenous Alaskan Nations that have lived in and taken care of the lands of Alaska since time immemorial.